OWNER: NHA SHOULD REVIEW PROCESS: Sporting Post: 9 July 2016

If growth in the participation in racehorse ownership by overseas people – actual Colour Holding – is considered desirable and may increase if the AHS situation improves, I suggest a review of the NHA forms. I write publicly because I have said this before and now hope that others might also (politely) lobby the NHA in this regard, says David Allan in the Sporting Post Mailbag.

On the renewal form (for example), there is a section titled “Race (For statistical purposes only)” with boxes to tick for “Black”, “Coloured”, “Indian”, “White”, “Other”. In the domestic context, that is not a matter for me but for the NHA and domestic convention or law or civility.

If it is acceptable to use the word “Coloured”, it is not for me to gainsay.

However in general parlance in USA, UK, Canada, and many other multi-racial nations as well as other huge English speaking populations (nothing to do with South African usage), “coloured” is considered pejorative / insulting / derogatory / unacceptable – take your pick.

So at the very least it is a surprise to overseas people to see it.

In my family’s case, my wife is “Other” on her colour holding form.

Therefore our Eurasian British daughter (who is both very British and very Japanese) is presumably “Other” as well.

Japanese people are inveterate tourists around the world, and are mostly well educated both in general and about their destinations.

Having to be “Honorary Whites” (to secure a trade deal in pig iron and continued in relation to sugar exports to Japan in which I was involved) may be less well known to the younger generation but crops up in research and objective guide books.

It is history of course, but why have a reminder? And what would our many British, Canadian and Australian friends of Indian/Pakistani/Bengali/Sri Lankan heritage put on this form if registering their own colours? Indian? Hardly.

Not to mention our actual Indian and Sri Lankan clients who might be persuaded if exports were facilitated.

Statistics are compiled by all racing bodies in periodic surveys. The apologetic reference to statistics on this form would be more credible if included in a more detailed survey also of age range and other demographic information.

For the purposes of continuing to introduce new owning blood to South Africa, I suggest that this section is removed from such forms. Statistics can be compiled in many other ways.

Of course there is another solution.

Eliminate the renewal forms altogether.

Annually completing, signing, copying, faxing, scanning, emailing, posting a form for something that is already on file is not the experience in other racing countries that I know.

Notice of automatic renewal is sent out in hard copy or digitally and payment charged if not cancelled (or cancelled if not paid).

The NHA system, as with other registrations, engenders a disproportionate amount of burden and work.

Owner: NHA Should Review Process

Ed – a copy of this letter has been sent to NHA CEO Lyndon Barends and RA CEO Larry Wainstein for a comment

Mr Barends responded within an hour:

We will review and revert. We’ve started this discussion (on annual registration forms) internally already. I will revert soon.

Best regards,

Lyndon Barends

Managing Director

National Horseracing Authority of Southern Africa